Watching A Debate: What to Expect

Are you looking for an exciting and engaging way to spend your time? Do you want to be a part of shaping the conversation and shaping the future of your community? Then, spectating a debate and participating in judging is the perfect activity for you.

Super Debate events provide a platform for individuals to engage with important and meaningful topics in a structured and productive way. As a spectator and judge, you will have the opportunity to witness the art of debate in action and to play an active role in determining the outcome.

Our judging criteria is designed to evaluate the debaters’ performance based on key elements of the art of debate. We focus on the organization and clarity of arguments, the use of argumentation and logic, the use of examples and evidence, the persuasiveness of communication and the overall performance of the debater. Our judging criteria is divided into five categories, with points ranging from 3 to 5, which will be rated by you. The higher scored side wins the round.

The Debate format: We utilize a simplified and efficient debate format, which is influenced by the traditional policy, parliamentary, and Lincoln-Douglas debate formats. Judging is carried out by the audience of community members, who use point-based criteria to score the winner. Each side has two speakers, Each side gets 3 speeches, outlined below. Each side gets 3 minutes of “prep time”, to use before their speeches.

Structure of the Debate: The structure of the debate is as follows:

  • Affirmative Case (AC) 5 Minutes
  • Cross-examination by the Negative (CX 1) 2 Minutes
  • Negative Case (NC) 5 Minutes
  • Cross-examination by the Affirmative (CX 2) 2 Minutes
  • Affirmative Rebuttal (AR) 4 Minutes
  • Negative Rebuttal (NR) 4 Minutes
  • Affirmative Closing Statement (ACS) 3 Minutes
  • Negative Closing Statement (NCS) 3 Minutes
  • Total Prep Time 6 minutes
  • Total Round Time 34 minutes

This structure isn’t rigid. In fact, it’s easy to add more time to the speeches in order to have a deeper debate. You can also add more speeches, or even add additional debaters to both sides of a team, to make the debates more interesting.

About The Speeches: The Case should have two or three contentions, which are the main arguments for its side, supported by evidence, and clearly organized. The Negative Rebuttal should refute the Affirmative Case, and not defend or extend the Negative Case. It should do this by line-by-line refutation, emphasizing responsiveness. The Affirmative Rebuttal has the challenging task of both refuting the Negative Case line-by-line, point-by-point, and defending the Affirmative Case against the Negative Rebuttal. The Closing Statements should summarize and crystallize the main arguments in the debate, and in particular extend one or two of their Case’s contentions.

By participating as a spectator and judge, you will be able to see first-hand how arguments are constructed and presented, and how evidence is used to support them. You’ll also be able to judge the debaters’ ability to persuade and connect with the audience. You will have the ability to evaluate the debaters’ performance based on the established criteria and to contribute to the outcome of the debate. It’s a great way to improve your own critical thinking and communication skills, to stay informed on current events and issues, and to be a part of shaping the conversation and shaping the future of your community.

Don’t miss this opportunity to be a part of a Super Debate event as a spectator and judge. Sign up now and experience the excitement and engagement of a Super Debate event first hand. Not only will you be entertained, but you will also be able to contribute to the outcome and to be a part of shaping the conversation and shaping the future of your community.

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